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Gallery of Oil Paintings in HD, What's Real?

Patrick James | Good

October 26, 2010


“Milk Girl,” by Diego Gravinese, is a traditional oil on canvas.

It’s been nearly 80 years since the critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin wrote “The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction,” in which he explored the void left by our ability to create photographic representations of images, which he felt lacked the aura or originality of the artist’s hand. In the years since then, high-definition photography has made it ever easier to produce realistic images (and, somewhat regrettably, photo-editing filters have allowed us to mimic “vintage” effects to with the click of a button).

Meanwhile, painting persists. In what’s sometimes called hyperrealism, a group of emerging and established artists create paintings and sculptures that approximate the appearance of high definition photography. The results are sometimes jarringly lifelike; other times, the artist focuses on the inherent flaws of digital photography—like compression errors or over-exposures—revealing something deeply human in the process.


Andy Denzler’s paintings resemble digital images that have only partially loaded or have encoding problems.

It’s been nearly 80 years since the critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin wrote “The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction,” in which he explored the void left by our ability to create photographic representations of images, which he felt lacked the aura or originality of the artist’s hand. In the years since then, high-definition photography has made it ever easier to produce realistic images (and, somewhat regrettably, photo-editing filters have allowed us to mimic “vintage” effects to with the click of a button).

Meanwhile, painting persists. In what’s sometimes called hyperrealism, a group of emerging and established artists create paintings and sculptures that approximate the appearance of high definition photography. The results are sometimes jarringly lifelike; other times, the artist focuses on the inherent flaws of digital photography—like compression errors or over-exposures—revealing something deeply human in the process.

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